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Musings of Megan Lavelle (me) and my mask, Ten/Four Studio.

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    grupaok:

Anthony McCall, Long Film for Ambient Light, installation at Idea Warehouse, New York, June 19, 1975, 3am

    grupaok:

    Anthony McCall, Long Film for Ambient Light, installation at Idea Warehouse, New York, June 19, 1975, 3am

    Posted on Sunday, April 13th 2014

    Reblogged from grupa o.k.

    nprfreshair:

Historian Terry Golway's book Machine Made is a colorful history of Tammany Hall, which takes a more sympathetic view of the organization than many historians. He says the Tammany machine, while often corrupt, gave impoverished immigrants critically needed social services and a road to assimilation. According to Golway, Tammany was responsible for progressive state legislation that foreshadowed the New Deal. He writes that some of Tammany's harshest critics, including cartoonist Thomas Nast, openly exhibited a raw anti-Irish and anti-Catholic prejudice:

Thomas Nast was a bigot. There’s no getting around it. He’s of course an icon in American history; his cartoons helped bring down Boss Tweed, and rightfully so…
Thomas Nast depicted the Irish as apes, as ignorant, drunken, violent thugs who followed Tammany simply because Tammany told them to follow. There wasn’t even interest there — they were just so stupid and ignorant that they didn’t know any better.
Thomas Nast was part of a New York militia unit on July 12, 1871, when there was a parade of Irish Protestants — July 12 is [practically a] national holiday in Northern Ireland to this day, where the Protestants commemorate a victory over the Catholics …
In New York … because of threats of violence and such, the National Guard was sent out. Thomas Nast was part of the National Guard and at a certain point, the National Guard, the militia, opened up [fire] on Catholics and about 26 or [2]7 Irish immigrants were killed and dozens and dozens wounded. After that, Thomas Nast drew a cartoon for Harper’s Weekly which shows the feminine figure of Columbia with her [hand] on the neck of the Irish and the caption simply read “Bravo.”

Nast cartoon via thomas nast cartoons

    nprfreshair:

    Historian Terry Golway's book Machine Made is a colorful history of Tammany Hall, which takes a more sympathetic view of the organization than many historians. He says the Tammany machine, while often corrupt, gave impoverished immigrants critically needed social services and a road to assimilation. According to Golway, Tammany was responsible for progressive state legislation that foreshadowed the New Deal. He writes that some of Tammany's harshest critics, including cartoonist Thomas Nast, openly exhibited a raw anti-Irish and anti-Catholic prejudice:

    Thomas Nast was a bigot. There’s no getting around it. He’s of course an icon in American history; his cartoons helped bring down Boss Tweed, and rightfully so…

    Thomas Nast depicted the Irish as apes, as ignorant, drunken, violent thugs who followed Tammany simply because Tammany told them to follow. There wasn’t even interest there — they were just so stupid and ignorant that they didn’t know any better.

    Thomas Nast was part of a New York militia unit on July 12, 1871, when there was a parade of Irish Protestants — July 12 is [practically a] national holiday in Northern Ireland to this day, where the Protestants commemorate a victory over the Catholics …

    In New York … because of threats of violence and such, the National Guard was sent out. Thomas Nast was part of the National Guard and at a certain point, the National Guard, the militia, opened up [fire] on Catholics and about 26 or [2]7 Irish immigrants were killed and dozens and dozens wounded. After that, Thomas Nast drew a cartoon for Harper’s Weekly which shows the feminine figure of Columbia with her [hand] on the neck of the Irish and the caption simply read “Bravo.”

    Nast cartoon via thomas nast cartoons

    Posted on Wednesday, March 12th 2014

    Reblogged from NPR Fresh Air